Paraphrenia: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Paraphrenia is a type of mental disorder characterized by paranoid delusions. The affected individual experiences imaginary fears or anxieties that are often exaggerated, but do not undergo significant loss of intellectual capabilities, such as memory and daily routine habits.

Although paraphrenia presents symptoms similar to schizophrenia, it often occurs only in the elderly, above the age of 60 and is also quite a rare condition. Schizophrenia, on the other hand, is often reported in teenagers, young adults, as well as middle-aged people.

 

Paraphrenia is, in the majority of the cases, not a very severe ailment. Nevertheless, it is absolutely essential to seek immediate medical care, as soon as typical indications of paraphrenia are recognized in any older person, to ensure timely treatment and efficient management of brain-related irregularities.

Causes

The main factors contributing to the development of paraphrenia in aged persons include:

Severe Neurological Illnesses

When the brain undergoes significant physical modifications, due to a tumour, stroke, grave injury, nerve or blood vessel damage, other neurodegenerative conditions, it affects its normal functioning and response to external stimuli. These abnormal instances could give rise to paraphrenia.

Stressful Personal Situations

Older adults who do not engage in regular social contact, are extremely disconnected from normal events going on around them, have no family or friends and struggle to sustain themselves suffer from serious emotional trauma to the brain. These challenging circumstances, in some cases, lead to paraphrenia.   more

Delusional Disorder, Erotomanic Type, Exacerbated by Social Media Use

Erotomania is a form of delusional disorder in which an individual believes that another person, usually of higher status, is in love with him. It is a relatively rare condition, and while the incidence is unknown, the lifetime prevalence of delusional disorder is 0.2% []. Consequently, many psychiatrists do not encounter or may fail to recognize erotomania in their clinical practice. Although many theories exist for the etiology of delusional disorder, recent postulations have suggested that social media networks may play a role in enmeshing technology into the delusional systems of those predisposed to psychosis []. Social media networks are now ubiquitous aspects of modern society, and this implication cannot be overlooked. We present the case of a 24-year-old male with delusions of multiple women being romantically interested in him. He then engaged in stalking behavior via social media. Although social media has been linked to schizophrenia exacerbations, this appears to be the first identified case of exacerbated delusional disorder [].

Mr. L is a 24-year-old male with no past family or personal psychiatric history who was brought to the emergency department by police for a psychiatric evaluation. The patient was discovered trespassing on local college property despite having been issued a No Contact Order following multiple complaints to the police and college administration by a female student. The student reported that he had been stalking her via Twitter and looking for her on the college campus. To substantiate her claims, she printed out a multitude of messages he sent her and gave these to the police and college administration. He proceeded to contact her several additional times, each time changing his Twitter username. He had been a student at the college; however, he was placed on suspension and ordered to remain off of campus property due to this behavior.   more

Mental Illness and the facts

What is mental illness?

 

Mental illnesses are medical conditions that disrupt a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others and daily functioning. Just as diabetes is a disorder of the pancreas, mental illnesses are medical conditions that often result in a diminished capacity for coping with the ordinary demands of life.

Serious mental illnesses include major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and borderline personality disorder. The good news about mental illness is that recovery is possible.

Mental illnesses can affect persons of any age, race, religion, or income. Mental illnesses are not the result of personal weakness, lack of character or poor upbringing. Mental illnesses are treatable. Most people diagnosed with a serious mental illness can experience relief from their symptoms by actively participating in an individual treatment plan.

In addition to medication treatment, psycho-social treatment such as cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, peer support groups and other community services can also be components of a treatment plan and that assist with recovery. The availability of transportation, diet, exercise, sleep, friends and meaningful paid or volunteer activities contribute to overall health and wellness, including mental illness recovery.   more

Dementia

Dementia

 

Overview

Dementia is a term used to describe a group of symptoms affecting memory, thinking and social abilities severely enough to interfere with your daily life. It isn’t a specific disease, but several diseases can cause dementia.

Though dementia generally involves memory loss, memory loss has different causes. Having memory loss alone doesn’t mean you have dementia, although it’s often one of the early signs of the condition.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of a progressive dementia in older adults, but there are a number of other causes of dementia. Depending on the cause, some dementia symptoms might be reversible.

 

Symptoms

Dementia symptoms vary depending on the cause, but common signs and symptoms include:

Cognitive changes

  • Memory loss, which is usually noticed by someone else
  • Difficulty communicating or finding words
  • Difficulty with visual and spatial abilities, such as getting lost while driving
  • Difficulty reasoning or problem-solving
  • Difficulty handling complex tasks
  • Difficulty with planning and organizing
  • Difficulty with coordination and motor functions
  • Confusion and disorientation

Psychological changes

  • Personality changes
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Inappropriate behavior
  • Paranoia
  • Agitation
  • Hallucinations   more

Psychotic Disorder

What Is a Psychotic Disorder?

 Medically Reviewed by Jennifer Casarella, MD on September 04, 2022

Psychotic disorders are a group of serious illnesses that affect the mind. They make it hard for someone to think clearly, make good judgments, respond emotionally, communicate effectively, understand reality, and behave appropriately.

When symptoms are severe, people with psychotic disorders have trouble staying in touch with reality and often are unable to handle daily life. But even severe psychotic disorders usually can be treated.

 

Causes

Doctors don’t know the exact cause of psychotic disorders. Researchers believe that many things play a role. Some psychotic disorders tend to run in families, which means that the disorder may be partly inherited. Other things may also influence their development, including stress, drug abuse, and major life changes.

People with certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia, may also have problems in parts of the brain that control thinking, perception, and motivation.

In schizophrenia, experts believe that nerve cell receptors that work with a brain chemical called glutamate may not work properly in specific brain regions. That glitch may contribute to problems with thinking and perception.

These conditions usually first appear when a person is in their late teens, 20s, or 30s. They tend to affect men and women about equally.  more

Depressive Episode

What is a depressive episode?

The definition of a depressive episode is a period of depression that persists for at least two weeks. During a depressive episode, a person will typically experience low or depressed mood and/or loss of interest in most activities, as well as a number of other symptoms of depression, such as tiredness, changes in appetite, feelings of worthlessness and recurrent thoughts of death. The length of a depressive episode varies, but the average duration is thought to be six to eight months.

Depression is a common illness, and many people will experience one or more episodes of depression in their lifetime. While people of all races and ages can experience depressive episodes, they tend to be more common among women than men. People who have a history of depression, other mental health conditions such as bipolar disorder or anxiety, or chronic physical conditions such as diabetes, chronic pain or multiple sclerosis, also have a higher risk of experiencing a depressive episode.

The severity of a depressive episode varies; it may be classified as major or minor, depending on the number of symptoms and degree of impairment (social, domestic and work) experienced. Regardless of the severity, all depressive episodes should be taken seriously and treated promptly by a professional healthcare provider. Effective treatment, which typically involves medication and/or therapy, for depression is available.

Without appropriate treatment, the risk of experiencing further episodes of depression is thought to be higher. The risk of another depressive episode occurring seems to increase with every new episode, with each one likely to last longer and be more severe than the previous one. Timely treatment can alleviate the symptoms of depression and help shorten the duration of any future episodes.  read more

The Witches || Sweet But Psycho

Lyrics
Oh, she’s sweet but a psycho
A little bit psycho
At night she’s screamin’
“I’m-ma-ma-ma out my mind”

Oh, she’s hot but a psycho
So left but she’s right, though
At night she’s screamin’
“I’m-ma-ma-ma out my mind”

She’ll make you curse, but she a blessin’
She’ll rip your shirt within a second
You’ll be coming back, back for seconds
With your plate, you just can’t help it

No, no, you’ll play along
Let her lead you on
You’ll be saying, “No, no”
Then saying, “Yes, yes, yes”
‘Cause she messin’ with your head

Oh, she’s sweet but a psycho
A little bit psycho
At night she’s screamin’
“I’m-ma-ma-ma out my mind”

Oh, she’s hot but a psycho
So left but she’s right, though
At night she’s screamin’
“I’m-ma-ma-ma out my mind”

“Grab a cop gun” kinda crazy
She’s poison but tasty
Yeah, people say, “Run, don’t walk away”

‘Cause she’s sweet but a psycho
A little bit psycho
At night she’s screamin’
“I’m-ma-ma-ma out my mind”

See, someone said, “Don’t drink her potions
She’ll kiss your neck with no emotion
When she’s mean, you know you love it
‘Cause she tastes so sweet, don’t sugarcoat it”

No, no, you’ll play along
Let her lead you on
You’ll be saying, “No (no, no, no), no (no)”
Then saying, “Yes, yes, yes”
‘Cause she messin’ with your head (hey)

Oh, she’s sweet but a psycho
A little bit psycho
At night she’s screamin’
“I’m-ma-ma-ma out my mind”

Oh, she’s hot but a psycho
So left but she’s right, though
At night she’s screamin’
“I’m-ma-ma-ma out my mind”

“Grab a cop gun” kinda crazy
She’s poison but tasty
Yeah, people say, “Run, don’t walk away”

‘Cause she’s sweet but a psycho
A little bit psycho
At night she’s screamin’
“I’m-ma-ma-ma out my mind”

You’re just like me, you’re out your mind
I know it’s strange, we’re both the crazy kind
You’re tellin’ me that I’m insane
Boy, don’t pretend that you don’t love the pain

Oh, she’s sweet but a psycho
A little bit psycho
At night she’s screamin’
“I’m-ma-ma-ma out my mind”

Oh, she’s hot but a psycho
So left but she’s right, though
At night she’s screamin’
“I’m-ma-ma-ma out my mind”
“Grab a cop gun” kinda crazy
She’s poison but tasty
Yeah, people say, “Run, don’t walk away”

‘Cause she’s sweet but a psycho
A little bit psycho
At night she’s screamin’
“I’m-ma-ma-ma out my mind”

Source: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Henry Russell Walter / William Lobban Bean / Madison Emiko Love / Andreas Haukeland / Amanda Koci
Sweet but Psycho lyrics © Artist Publishing Group Gmr, Max Cut Publishing

Artist: Ava Max
Album: Sweet but Psycho
Released: 2018
Key: D♭ Major hooktheory.com