Cybersecurity Mental Health Warning — 1 In 6 CISOs Now Medicate Or Use Alcohol

A new global study of cybersecurity professionals has revealed the true extent to which the stresses and pressures facing the average CISO impact upon both professional and personal life. It should come as no surprise that stress is part of the job description for the CISO, and every one of the 408 questioned for the Life Inside the Perimeter: Understanding the Modern CISO report, commissioned by Nominet, said they were indeed experiencing stress. However, that 17% said that they had turned to medication or alcohol to help deal with that stress should be a statistic that shocks us all.

Stress is undoubtedly playing a part as far as the decline in the mental health of the modern CISO is concerned; 91% of the CISOs surveyed said the levels of stress they were suffering was moderate or high and 60% rarely disconnected from their work role. That 88% worked more than 40 hours per week isn’t a shocker, nor the 27% that work up to 60 hours, but with 1 in 5 being available 24/7 and 89% of U.S. based CISOs never having had a two week break from their job, the true extent of this disconnect problem becomes clear.  more

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4 mental-health disorders you probably don’t know much about — and one that will shock you

The conversation around mental-health disorders has been more vocal in recent years and it’s not a moment too soon. According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, one in five Canadians will experience a mental-health issue in any given year, and 8 per cent of adults will experience an episode of major depression in their lifetime.

But while depression, suicide and bipolar disorder are well-known terms and their symptoms relatively well-documented, there is a host of other illnesses that go largely unmentioned and misunderstood.

Here are five notable mental-health disorders that you may not know much about, but that can come with real repercussions.  more

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Saskatoon teen creates mental health app for victims of bullying

A Saskatoon teen who was bullied in school starting in Grade 2 has developed an app to help other kids address and cope with mental health and bullying. 

Kelli Lemstra says the bullying began in Grade 2.

“I was struggling with the relationships with a lot of my friends,” she said. “It got really hard when everyone started getting cell phones which was in Grade 7 and 8.” That’s when the 16-year-old said things became unbearable.

“(People) were texting me awful things, commenting on all of my social media, making rude accounts about me, calling me on my phone on unknown caller telling me to kill myself,” she said.

With what Kelli thought was a lack of support from her school, and no way to make the bullying stop, the teen and her parents didn’t know where to turn.  more

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How Women Are Watching Porn Today, Because We’re Viewing It On Our Phones More Than Men

In case anyone out there had any doubts, women do watch porn. In fact, many love watching it on the regular and the number of women who admit to watching porn continue to rise each year. So in honor of International Women’s Day, Pornhub put together a list of insights on how women are watching porn. It might surprise you to know that we’re significantly watching more of it on one particular device than men are.

According to Pornhub’s 2016 Year in Review, it was found that women make up over a fourth of all visitors on the site. And, Pornhub saw significant decreases in traffic on January 21, the day of the Women’s March. Viewership even dropped over 20 percent in major cities like Washington D.C., New York, and Los Angeles. If traffic can change that much, clearly porn isn’t just a guy thing like many choose to believe.  more

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Mental illness, Addiction and Digital Infidelity

Fifty years ago, I was six years old.  My family, like many families of the day, subscribed to Life magazine.  On the cover of the magazine for the week of September 16, 1966 was a picture of Sophia Loren.  The Hollywood starlet was portrayed wearing a black see-through lacy dress that covered all the necessary parts, and covered all the necessary standards for 1966.  But the picture left an image upon my brain that I can easily recall to this day.

Fifty years later, digital pornographic images are now easily accessible.  The Internet has made it possible for thousands of images and videos to be accessed within seconds.  The Internet has made it available for instant digital infidelity to occur.  Such images and encounters can easily be accessed on any smartphone, tablet, and computer.  more

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Why, as a woman, I love watching porn

Porn is that age-old subject that seems to endlessly divide people – most notably women. Some call it misogynistic and out-dated, others can’t get enough of it.

Myself? I love a bit of porn. And not your ‘feminised’ version either, but your bog standard, easily available, Red Tube smut. It turns me on — both with a partner and on my own.

There is still a stigma attached to women watching porn, with much of the criticism aimed at the banal narratives of your average skin flick – we’re ‘supposed’ to enjoy things which are more mentally arousing.  more

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Women are watching more porn: reports

Ladies tuned into more pornography than ever last year with the phrase “porn for women” topping a list of the most searched fetishes online, new data revealed Tuesday.

The female-friendly term soared a panty-droppin’ 1,400 percent in 2017, compared to a 396 percent spike the year before, according to a report released by the steamy site PornHub.com.

Lady horndogs made up 26 percent of the website’s 28.5 billion world-wide annual visitors, in part due to a rise in global viewership, according to the report.

More women are tuning in to online nudie flicks in countries such as South Africa, Saudi Arabia and Mexico, according to xHamster.com, a porn site that also released an end-of-the-year report.

In the U.S. , the porn term most often searched by women was “Daddy” while globally it was “Mom,” according to xHamster.com.  more

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WHO Calls ‘Gaming Disorder’ Mental Health Condition

The World Health Organization is recognizing “gaming disorder” as a diagnosable condition.

But the organization’s decision to include the new term in the 11thedition of its International Classification of Diseases (ICD), which it released Monday, has sparked controversy among psychiatric experts who question whether there’s enough research to call it a true disorder.

According to the American Psychological Association, an estimated 160 million American adults play video games, but the percentage of people that could qualify for the disorder is extremely small. Players’ ages range from under 18 to over 50, and the male-to-female ratio is almost equal.  more

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The Mental Health Crisis is upon the Internet Generation

PublicDomainPictures / PixabayMy student Julie and I recently conducted a study on the mental health outcomes associated with being separated from family during the college years (such as by going to college out of state, which is, of course, very common). The findings were complex – and I won’t bore you with nuances here. But I will provide you with one headline that struck me: In our sample of over 200 college students, 59% reported having been diagnosed at some point with some psychological disorder. Note: This is not 59% reporting that they sometimes feel anxious or depressed. This question very explicitly asked if they had been diagnosed with a disorder.

Think about that.

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How the Internet affects your mental health

These days, it seems like we live our lives on the Internet, but can excessive Internet and social media use impact your mental health?  While it’s a helpful tool for education, work, social interaction and entertainment, overuse can take a toll on your health, says Saju Mathew, M.D., a primary care physician at Piedmont.

Internet use and anxiety

Whether it’s from reading too much negative news or researching your symptoms online – something Dr. Mathew says he sees frequently among his patients – too much computer time can increase your anxiety.

“More times than not, it’s not a good idea to research your health symptoms online because the final outcome is a lot of unnecessary anxiety and worry. My overall advice is not to research your symptoms, but to see a doctor first [if you have a health concern].”  more

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