Why was this Philly coffee shop OK normalizing mental health conditions and drug misuse?

A pink neon sign reading “Up All Night on Adderall” hung on the brick wall of Common Grounds, a coffee shop that opened in September on 16th Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue.

The lighted fixture is decorated with either a quarter moon or sun, begging to be Instagrammed. On the coffee shop’s Instagram account, the sign shares a feed with an image of a quote attributed to Coco Chanel.

After facing critics, including myself, a Temple University 2017 alumna who looks to increase awareness for mental health, substance use disorders, and the intersecting factors, Common Grounds plans to take down the sign and change the phrase as of Oct. 23. However, for every “like” the sign desires to collect while it hangs, it represents the misconstrued, insensitive, and contradictory narratives many have about mental health and substance misuse.  more

What Happens To Your Brain When You Have A Hangover

To some people, part of going out with friends is drinking alcohol. Even though it may be fun at the time, especially since that new speakeasy serves amazing, one-of-a-kind drinks, the aftermath may not be as fun. Yep, the hangover: You’re exhausted, feel as though your head will explode since it hurts so much, and you may be nauseous or vomiting, too, among other symptoms. But something you may not think about is what happens to your brain when you’re hungover.

“The effects of alcohol are more significant than some realize — it impacts brain function and neurochemistry,” Dr. Adam Lipson, a neurosurgeon at IGEA Brain & Spine, tells Bustle. “Frequent hangovers are a sign of alcoholism. In my world as a surgeon, one hangover is too much. Everyone has a different relationship with this issue, but frequent hangovers should be considered a red flag.”

While you may not think a post-drinking headache is a big deal, a lot more is going on inside your head after drinking alcohol than you may think. Below, you’ll find some key things that happen to your brain when you have a hangover, according to experts and studies.  more

Alcohol or cannabis? Science has finally revealed which one is more harmful

If you’ve ever wondered whether booze or weed is worse for your health, it appears that science finally has the answer.

There are dozens of factors to account for, including how the substances affect your heart, brain, and behavior, and how likely you are to get hooked.

A comprehensive round-up of studies by the team over at IFLScience appears to show that cannabis isn’t as bad for you as alcohol is.

More than 30,700 Americans died from alcohol-induced causes in 2014 – not including drinking-related accidents or homicides – while there have been zero documented deaths from marijuana use alone.
According to the World Health Organisation, booze is thought to contribute to 3.3 million deaths across the globe each year which, soberingly, equates to one person dying every 10 seconds.  more

Super Agent Prince Comes Back From Opiate Addiction; Micky Ward and Prince In Q n A

The issue is one that transcends all boundaries and spheres. Opiate addiction hits in every pocket of society, and but of course, touches people in all walks of life and stations.

Sports agent Darren Prince has enjoyed a top grade roster of clients, and today, just having moved to LA after growing up and residing in NJ, reps names like Ric Flair, Hulk Hogan, Dennis Rodman, Charlie Sheen and ex fighters Roy Jones Jr and Micky Ward.

Tonight, Oct. 18, Prince, age 48, will appear at a book-store in NJ to sign copies of his memoir, “Aiming High: How a Prominent Sports and Celebrity Agent Hit Bottom at the Top,” alongside Ward.   more

Report: World Support For Mental Health Care Is ‘Pitifully Small’

It’s a major milestone in the fight to recognize mental health and mental illness as global issues: a comprehensive report from the Lancet Commission on Global Mental Health, three years in the making, released this past week at a London summit with royals Prince William and Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, in attendance to show their support for the cause.

But it was not a celebratory event. Threaded throughout the 45-page report is a lament that the world is ignoring millions of suffering people.

That neglect is reflected in “pitifully small” levels of financial support from governments and assistance groups for research and patient care, say the 28 mental health researchers, clinicians and advocates from across five continents who authored the report. And there are far-reaching economic as well as psychological consequences, the report notes: Untreated patients are often unable to support themselves, and sometimes their caretakers can’t work as well.  more

True Story: April

Addiction has been a part of my family for as long as I can remember. It affected my life before I even had a choice. My sister was addicted, my mother was addicted…the list goes on and on. My parents got divorced when I was 12; around then is when I started using. I dropped acid, drank alcohol, and smoked a lot of pot. It wasn’t total dependency yet, but I was dabbling. I gave birth to my dAprilaughter Jessica when I was 19; the love for her is what motivated me to get my life together.  more

Why You Have Drug Dreams Once You’re Sober

If you’re recovering from an addiction and have been sober for awhile, you may start to experience disturbing dreams. It’s a common occurrence to experience dreams so vivid, you wake up believing you just used drugs. This is usually terrifying if you’ve been struggling with recovery from addiction and you may even experience a sense of guilt when you wake up. Drug dreams will usually be a nightmare with the conscious fear of relapse.

These dreams are a part of the recovery process and can even be considered positive. They can be a gauge on how your recovery is moving along. You might think you’ve made it past your addiction but sometimes, there’s an underlying part of you that is still dependent on the substance.  more

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Addiction

Obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD, is an anxiety disorder in which an individual experiences recurring thoughts that cause irrational fears and anxiety. Individuals with OCD engage in repeated, compulsive rituals, such as counting items, hand washing and organizing. Executing these rituals provides temporary relief while they are being performed, but the anxiety returns soon after they stop. OCD is a highly destructive disorder that can overtake the life of an individual and keep him from enjoying many life’s most rewarding activities.

The Journal of Anxiety Disorders estimates that over 25 percent of those who seek treatment for OCD also meet the criteria for a substance use disorder. Individuals who experience OCD symptoms for the first time in childhood or adolescence are more likely to develop a drug or alcohol problem, often as a way to cope with overwhelming anxiety and fear. Treating an addictive disorder without addressing the emotional symptoms of OCD is unlikely to be effective.  more

The Connection Between Mental Illness and Substance Abuse

he National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) reports that there is a “definite connection between mental illness and the use of addictive substances” and that mental health disorder patients are responsible for the consumption of:

  • 38 percent of alcohol
  • 44 percent of cocaine
  • 40 percent of cigarettes

Self-Medication

By far the most common issue connecting mental illness and substance abuse is the intention of patients to medicate the mental health symptoms that they find disruptive or uncomfortable by using alcohol and drugs.  more