Mental illness, Addiction and Digital Infidelity

Fifty years ago, I was six years old.  My family, like many families of the day, subscribed to Life magazine.  On the cover of the magazine for the week of September 16, 1966 was a picture of Sophia Loren.  The Hollywood starlet was portrayed wearing a black see-through lacy dress that covered all the necessary parts, and covered all the necessary standards for 1966.  But the picture left an image upon my brain that I can easily recall to this day.

Fifty years later, digital pornographic images are now easily accessible.  The Internet has made it possible for thousands of images and videos to be accessed within seconds.  The Internet has made it available for instant digital infidelity to occur.  Such images and encounters can easily be accessed on any smartphone, tablet, and computer.  more

Video gamers react to the WHO adding ‘gaming disorder’ to its mental health conditions

The potential risks of playing too many video games have been debated since arcades, home consoles and computers began going mainstream in the 1970s and 80s. But the World Health Organization announced on Monday that it is labeling “gaming disorder” as a mental health condition for the first time, and has included the term in its updated International Classification of Disease being published this year.

WHO doesn’t give a specific window for whether four hours, 12 or 24 counts as too much time gaming. It warns that the digital distraction becomes a disorder when “increasing priority [is] given to gaming to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other life interests and daily activities,” and if the person continues to play or escalates how much they play despite negative consequences, such as interfering with their work or education, dissolving their relationships and hurting their personal health.  more

WHO Calls ‘Gaming Disorder’ Mental Health Condition

The World Health Organization is recognizing “gaming disorder” as a diagnosable condition.

But the organization’s decision to include the new term in the 11thedition of its International Classification of Diseases (ICD), which it released Monday, has sparked controversy among psychiatric experts who question whether there’s enough research to call it a true disorder.

According to the American Psychological Association, an estimated 160 million American adults play video games, but the percentage of people that could qualify for the disorder is extremely small. Players’ ages range from under 18 to over 50, and the male-to-female ratio is almost equal.  more

WHO to recognize gaming disorder as mental health condition

In 2018, playing video games obsessively might lead to a diagnosis of a mental health disorder.

In the beta draft of its forthcoming 11th International Classification of Diseases, the World Health Organization includes “gaming disorder” in its list of mental health conditions. The WHO defines the disorder as a “persistent or recurrent” behavior pattern of “sufficient severity to result in significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning.”

The disorder is characterized by “impaired control” with increasing priority given to gaming and “escalation,” despite “negative consequences.”  more

How the Internet affects your mental health

These days, it seems like we live our lives on the Internet, but can excessive Internet and social media use impact your mental health?  While it’s a helpful tool for education, work, social interaction and entertainment, overuse can take a toll on your health, says Saju Mathew, M.D., a primary care physician at Piedmont.

Internet use and anxiety

Whether it’s from reading too much negative news or researching your symptoms online – something Dr. Mathew says he sees frequently among his patients – too much computer time can increase your anxiety.

“More times than not, it’s not a good idea to research your health symptoms online because the final outcome is a lot of unnecessary anxiety and worry. My overall advice is not to research your symptoms, but to see a doctor first [if you have a health concern].”  more