Center takes strict approach to suboxone treatment

For Cynthia Anders, battling drug withdrawal symptoms came in the form of a black box with a 3-D T-Rex covering.

It has been several weeks since she had possession of the box, but it became a colorful symbol of her ongoing recovery from opiate abuse.

The box was used to keep her prescriptions to buprenorphine, most commonly known by the brand name Suboxone. It is a method, some view as controversial, that uses an opioid to treat opioid addiction by weaning off the cravings.  more

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A Rural Community Decided To Treat Its Opioid Problem Like A Natural Disaster

When he was police chief of Stanwood, Wash., population 7,000, Ty Trenary thought rural communities like his were immune from the opioid crisis.

Then, one day, a mother walked through his door and said, “Chief, you have a heroin problem in your community.”

“And I remember thinking, ‘Well that’s not possible,’ ” Trenary recalls. “This is Stanwood and heroin is in big cities with homeless populations. It’s not in rural America.”

Last year leaders declared the opioid epidemic a life-threatening emergency. The county is now responding to the drug crisis as if it were a natural disaster, the same way they’d mobilize to respond to a landslide or flu pandemic.  more

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Teen Xanax abuse is surging

Teen drug use during the summer often goes unnoticed. It’s when school starts and students nod off in class, exchange pills in the hallways and fail tests that the truth becomes apparent.

This school year, addiction specialists say they’re expecting an onslaught of teens addicted to Xanax and other sedatives in a class of anti-anxiety drugs known as benzodiazepines, or “benzos.” Many teens view Xanax as a safer and more plentiful alternative to prescription opioids and heroin — with similar euphoric effects.

But addiction experts warn that the pills kids are taking, often found in their parents’ or grandparents’ medicine cabinets, can be just as deadly as opioids, especially when taken in combination with other drugs or alcohol. And it’s much harder to kick the habit.  more

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Super Agent Prince Comes Back From Opiate Addiction; Micky Ward and Prince In Q n A

The issue is one that transcends all boundaries and spheres. Opiate addiction hits in every pocket of society, and but of course, touches people in all walks of life and stations.

Sports agent Darren Prince has enjoyed a top grade roster of clients, and today, just having moved to LA after growing up and residing in NJ, reps names like Ric Flair, Hulk Hogan, Dennis Rodman, Charlie Sheen and ex fighters Roy Jones Jr and Micky Ward.

Tonight, Oct. 18, Prince, age 48, will appear at a book-store in NJ to sign copies of his memoir, “Aiming High: How a Prominent Sports and Celebrity Agent Hit Bottom at the Top,” alongside Ward.   more

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A young mom’s powerful obituary is shedding light on opioid addiction

A young Vermont mother who died as a result of opioid addiction is being memorialized by her family in a fearless obituary calling for a more open understanding of the illness that took her life.

Madelyn Linsenmeir, 30, died October 7. In her obituary published in The Burlington Free Press, her family wasted no time in sharing the truth: Linsenmeir was addicted to drugs. But, they said, she was also a loving mother, a beloved daughter, a talented singer and a charming person even in the throes of addiction.
“It is impossible to capture a person in an obituary, and especially someone whose adult life was largely defined by drug addiction,” the obituary reads. “To some, Maddie was just a junkie—when they saw her addiction they stopped seeing her. And what a loss for them.”  more
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World in mental health crisis of ‘monumental suffering’, say experts

Lancet report says 13.5 million lives could be saved every year if mental illness addressed

Every country in the world is facing and failing to tackle a mental health crisis, from epidemics of anxiety and depression to conditions caused by violence and trauma, according to a review by experts that estimates the rising cost will hit $16tn (£12tn) by 2030.

A team of 28 global experts assembled by the Lancet medical journal says there is a “collective failure to respond to this global health crisis” which “results in monumental loss of human capabilities and avoidable suffering.”  more

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Are Doctors, Teens and Coaches Inadvertently Turning Teen Athletes into Addicts?

The discussion began a few years ago, when facts about concussions began to emerge: Do coaches, parents and even some doctors go too far in pushing teen athletes to be all that they can be?

After much reflection, the answer has turned out to be: “Sometimes, yes.”

But now the problem is even worse than allowing (or encouraging) some child athletes to keep playing when they have a concussion. Some of those people who are supposed to be watching over them are pushing them so hard, they are turning them into heroin addicts.  more

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Depression and Opioid Abuse

It’s no secret that opioid abuse is a growing problem in the United States. An estimated 2.4 million people in the United States abuse prescription painkillers, and almost half a million people suffer from heroin abuse. But people abusing opioids also often face the additional burden of depression. Left untreated, this often hidden mental illness can make recovery even more difficult.

The relationship between opioid abuse and depression is bi-directional, meaning that suffering from one increases the risk of the other. Opioid abuse is defined as using a prescription opioid for non-medical reasons or using it longer or in greater amounts than what was prescribed by a doctor, and opioid abuse has been linked to higher rates of depressionanxiety, and bipolar disorders.  more

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