People share what it was like to be admitted to a mental health hospital

There is still a huge stigma around mental health hospitals.
Many horror films are set within abandoned mental health hospitals, creating a common perception that they’re places of outdated, horrific treatments and people screaming in the corridors.
This isn’t reflective of reality.

30-year-old Rebecca has been admitted to a psychiatric hospital three times. The first was in June 2008, the second October 2009, and the third June 2010. All of these admissions were for anorexia.

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Are People Starting To Care More About Their Mental Health Than Weight Loss?

When I rounded up the best health books of 2018, I noticed a common theme emerging: Most of them were either directly about mental health or had a strong mental health or brain health component. There’s no doubt about it, this facet of wellness is becoming more and more of a top priority for people all over the world.

When you think about this rise in popularity, it makes sense; our lifestyle changes drastically affect the health of our minds, and in exchange, our mental health greatly affects our ability to make healthy lifestyle choices. Essentially, we need both to be truly healthy.

Knowing this, it doesn’t come as a huge surprise that sales of books about mental health are soaring. What might surprise you, however, is that this year they surpassed sales of books about diet and exercise.   more

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People share what it was like to be admitted to a mental health hospital

There is still a huge stigma around mental health hospitals.

Many horror films are set within abandoned mental health hospitals, creating a common perception that they’re places of outdated, horrific treatments and people screaming in the corridors.
This isn’t reflective of reality. 30-year-old Rebecca has been admitted to a psychiatric hospital three times.
The first was in June 2008, the second October 2009, and the third June 2010.
All of these admissions were for anorexia.

Rebecca tells Metro.co.uk: ‘For the first admission, I had no idea that psych hospitals really existed and had no ideas of what it would be like. ‘I was very annoyed to be admitted to hospital because I wanted to carry on losing weight. ‘For the second admission I knew what I was expecting and had a definite target set before I was admitted so I knew what I needed to do.’  more

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This is what body shaming is doing to your mental health: Why you should refrain from body shaming

Body shaming, as the name suggests, is shaming someone for their body shape or body type. It is a modern term recently coined and talked about, but body shaming in practice has existed for a very long time.

People have a definite notion of “beauty” which defines standards of skin colour, body dimensions, hair length, or the kind of clothes someone should or should not wear. People are always too thin, too fat, too tall, too short, too dark, or too fair for the society, and it has repercussions that are not even realised in everyday life. Body shaming affects mental and physical health in surprising ways- both for the person who is body shaming and the one who is being body shamed.  more

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Tech firms enter the business of campus mental health care

At many college counseling centers therapists are overwhelmed and students are forced to wait weeks for an appointment, even as more of them seek help for anxiety, depression, and sleep and eating disorders.

Christie Campus Health, a Lexington start-up that will be launched Wednesday, thinks it has a solution: technology.

Christie, an arm of the Mary Christie Foundation, plans to partner with colleges and universities to handle the overflow of short-term counseling needs, using a network of therapists who are available online or over the phone.  more

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Eating Disorders: A Guide to Getting Treatment for A Healthy Future

Your eating behaviors will change throughout your entire life. Part of transitioning into adulthood involves learning how to be healthy without overdoing it. You also have to figure out how to love your body rather than be ashamed of it. For many people, this is no simple task.

When damaging eating behaviors and negative thoughts become persistent, they can turn into eating disorders. Up to 30 million people in the United States suffer from an eating disorder. These disorders are characterized by a lack of control over eating habits, which can include eating very small or very large amounts, and a hyper focus on your weight and body shape.  more

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My anorexia didn’t come from a ‘fear of eating’ – it started because I found comfort in habit and routine

I will never forget the car journey home from the clinic after I was diagnosed with anorexia. I sat in the back seat, looked out the window and let everything sink in.

The week that followed was the first week where I didn’t dance, horseride, do PE or even walk to school. Before all of this had happened, I used to worship those occasional car rides to school, but now the regular car rides back and forth felt like rubbing salt in the wound. It was during those car rides that I realised how much I enjoyed walking to school with my mother in the early morning. I guess it’s true what they say: you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone.  more

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What is an eating disorder?

Amy’s Story

Life with an eating disorder, if you can call it life, is similar to a puppet show. You are the dancing, smiling puppet, and your disorder is the puppeteer. It calls the shots and pulls the strings. It tells you when you’re going to eat and how much. It even writes the script, putting its own values where yours used to be. All of a sudden, you don’t care about your health, your friends or your dreams. All you care about is being thin, and you don’t even really know how it happened, when, or why. So there you go, smiling as your bony body bounces around onstage. Some clap at your slenderness, while most stare in horror at what you’ve become. They don’t know that you go backstage and cry because you’re tired, hungry and scared.

It’s funny because I consider myself a very educated, intelligent, beautiful and successful woman – but a few years ago I was trapped with an eating disorder.

It started out so simple; in high school with the desire to be thin, and ended up as a powerful, inner, self-loathing endless mental battle. I slowly began to lose not only my weight, but my reality, my mind, my friends as well as anything and everything that I cared and loved. Anorexia had 100% control of me and my life. I was no longer Amy. I was an eating disorder, a lying, destructive, conniving eating disorder  more

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Common Mental Health Disorders in Young Adults

The life of a young adult is a like a rollercoaster that last for years. With emotional ups and downs and ins and outs, a young person can feel on the verge of something – anything – long after puberty sets in. Early adulthood is a period marked by changes and growth physically, mentally, and emotionally. It is also during this time that the onset of mental health disorders can occur – illnesses that can severely impact the life of the individual for years to come.

First, it’s understood that young adults can be moody, cranky, and angst-ridden with or without the influence of a mental health disorder. That’s just part of growing up. Young adults generally love or hate things, and one bad day can make them feel like the world is toppling down.  more

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