The Battle Over Brett Kavanaugh Has Ended. But the Pain His Hearing Triggered Has Not

Since #MeToo went viral, survivors have been inundated with stories of sexual assault and harassment on a weekly — and for some stretches, daily — basis. But nothing had evoked memories and pains of past traumas in some survivors, and particularly women, as much as the respective testimonies of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Senators, television personalities and people across the country heard stories from loved ones that they had never been told before. The Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) saw a 388% increase in traffic on its hotline from the Thursday of the hearing to the following Sunday. That Friday was the busiest day in the organization’s 24-year history. No other single #MeToo moment appeared to precipitate that sort of deluge.

Survivors with histories of sexual abuse are at higher risk of exhibiting PTSD symptoms whenever a #MeToo story hits the news, according to Freyd. But such allegations are often blips in the 24-hour news cycle. The Kavanaugh story dragged on, with an apparent strain on many survivors that the Harvey Weinstein and Bill Cosby allegations did not inspire — and it will continue to do so as he takes his seat on the Supreme Court. Experts say that all that has happened could have lasting effects on the psychology of many victims of sexual assault.  more

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‘Cry Havoc!’: Onstage ‘Personal Journey’ Portrays Need to Help Vets ‘Un-wire from War’

Army veteran Stephan Wolfert will present “Cry Havoc,” the story of his struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder during performances and workshops that begin tonight at Fort Greely and continue into the weekend in Fairbanks. Wolfert’s a classically trained actor who says he found relief from PTSD on stage, especially when performing Shakespeare.

“Now is the winter of our discontent …”

That’s the opening line from Shakespeare’s “Richard III,” the story of the conniver who became King of England after murdering and imprisoning his rivals. It’s not an uplifting story, but Stephan Wolfert says seeing it at a low point in his life helped inspire him to pick up the pieces, turn himself around and tell his story, on stage.

“It’s a personal journey from being in the military, having a horrific experience after the first Gulf War was over – a buddy of mine was killed in training at Fort Irwin, California. I lost it – I can say that now – I didn’t know what was going on,” he said in an interview with New York public-radio member station WSKG.  more

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‘He more or less saved my life’: Recovering addict speaks about fallen trooper

When David Wright first met Trooper Kevin Conner four years ago, the 11-year veteran of the N.C. Highway Patrol put him in handcuffs and charged him with driving while impaired.

“I was under the influence of narcotics and alcohol, ran a truck into a ditch and he was the trooper on the scene,” Wright said. “Naturally, he took me to the jail in Whiteville.”

Like many on the wrong side of the law, Wright, a self-proclaimed recovering addict, initially disliked Conner. But his perception of the law enforcement officer quickly changed.

“As soon as he got me handcuffed and in the car, he was more a more caring person, he was human then to me,” Wright explained. “He was talking to me on the way (to jail) about ‘you can beat this thing at your age, this is good, consider this tough love.’”

That relationship developed into a friendship of sorts, lasting beyond Wright’s court case.  more

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Mental health event brings stories of help, hope

STOCKTON — Marsha Posner Williams is a successful television producer, winner of two Emmy and three Golden Globe awards for “The Golden Girls.”

Yael Deynes, who survived a suicide attempt, physical and mental abuse by his biological mother in his native Puerto Rico and controlling, mental abuse at the hands of his former gay lover, has made an award-winning short film and is seeking funding for his first feature-length motion picture.

The two will share their stories of success and offer encouragement Friday when they speak on “Curing The Stigma” from 1:30-3 p.m. in the Tillie Lewis Theatre as San Joaquin Delta College concludes its observance of Mental Health Awareness Week.  more

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Former USC Football Captain Kevin Ellison Dies After Walking Along a California Freeway

Friends and family are mourning the sudden loss of former USC and San Diego Chargers player Kevin Ellison after he died while walking along a California freeway. He was 31.

However, exactly how he died is not clear at this time and an exam is currently pending.

Ellison’s brother, Chris, told the L.A. Times his sibling was suffering from severe mental health issues around the time of his death.

“He was disoriented and didn’t know where he was at,” Chris said to the paper. “I’m sure he was trying to come home and find his family. We love him so much… My mom and sister and dad and brother did everything they could.”  more

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Everything You Should Know About Thanatophobia

What is thanatophobia?

Thanatophobia is commonly referred to as the fear of death. More specifically, it can be a fear of death or a fear of the dying process.

It’s natural for someone to worry about their own health as they age. It’s also common for someone to worry about their friends and family after they’re gone. However, in some people, these concerns can develop into more problematic worries and fears.  more

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World Suicide Prevention Day

Welcome

The World Health Organization estimates that over 800,000 people die by suicide each year – that’s one person every 40 seconds. In Australia more than 2800 people die each year with latest figures (2016) telling us that 2,866 Australians took their own life. Recent research tells us that hundreds of Australians are impacted by each suicide death. Research also tells us that some 65,000 people attempt suicide each year and hundreds of thousands of people think of suicide.  Take a minute to think about the pain and suffering suicide being felt by every single person impacted by suicide.  more

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