What people taking antidepressants, psychiatric medication want you to know

Telling people that they’re ‘crazy’ or they’ll become an addict if they take psychiatric medications does more harm than good.

A family member notices you taking an antidepressant and suggests that if you smiled a little more you’d be able to beat that depression without drugs. Other well-meaning friends or family don’t hesitate to share their opinions — often based on myths or misinformation — about psychiatric medications with you, or anyone else. It’s pill shaming and it’s simply another way of stigmatizing mental illness, doctors say.

One in six Americans takes some kind of psychiatric drugs, mostly antidepressants. Many people who have a prescription for psychiatric medications also use talk therapy, mindfulness or exercise to manage their symptoms. But it’s the prescription pills that typically bring out the judgy comments.  more

Please follow and like us:

14 Insane Stories From People Who Almost Got Murdered And Made It Out Alive

I survived a stabbing

I was stabbed while bouncing at a bar. I’m not sure if that counts. I doubt the guy was really trying to kill me, though he very easily could have. It required emergency surgery to close up an artery and the knife stopped just shy of puncturing my lung. My friend, also bouncing, was stabbed over his heart, but his sternum stopped the blade. That’s probably what caused the stabber to slice his own fingers open, which lead to finding him and the conviction.

He was charged with attempted murder, along with a bunch of other things. He was convicted of at least some of those charges and did 6 years.

All in all, not bad. 10/10, would get stabbed again.  more

Please follow and like us:

What ‘Am I Crazy?’ Really Means

Have you found yourself typing “Am I crazy?” into Google or asking Siri? You probably got back a patchwork of results, from online “sanity tests” to mental health forums.

Fortunately, most people who do such searches aren’t actually going “crazy,” as in developing delusions, paranoia, or hallucinations, says Gerald Goodman, PhD, an emeritus professor of psychology at UCLA.

“Believing that you are going crazy is a good clue that you are sane,” he says.

When someone is developing a serious mental illness with psychosis, such as schizophrenia, they usually don’t know it. “Part of ‘crazy’ is getting away from reality,” Goodman says.  more

Please follow and like us:

Hospital Addressing Physician Suicide Crisis By Asking Doctors To Wear “Crazy” Socks

Since January, three female medical professionals — two physicians and a medical student — have tragically died by suicide in New York City. Their deaths have been bringing attention to a hidden mental health crisis impacting physicians all across the U.S. — one in which some hospitals are addressing by asking their doctors to wear “crazy” socks.

On May 30, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital — where a young physician leapt to her death in January — sent an email to staff about Crazy Socks 4 Docs, an initiative started by an Australian physician, aimed at bringing awareness to the mental health of doctors worldwide.  more
Please follow and like us: