Mental health in boxing: Fighting the longest, hardest fight

Recent attempts to eradicate the stigma surrounding mental health issues can only be positive for the sport of boxing.

“It’s not about how hard you hit. It’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward.”

Sure, it may be a little reductionist, a little trite, to lead into such a sensitive topic of mental health with a quote from a Hollywood movie, however, this infamous Rocky quote subtly underlines the plight of hundreds, thousands, millions of people across the world struggling with what goes on between their ears.

There is no exception to this rule in boxing; in fact, mental health issues are predicted to be prevalent in our sport more than others on a comparable level. Think of the fundamental associations made with boxing. Fighters, expected to be the “tough guys” of the sporting world, unaffected, unstirred, unmoved by any emotional or psychological troubles that may attempt to counter their perceived strengths.  more

Tyson Fury has beaten his demons to become a champion for mental health

The heavyweight boxer who used to pray for death has shown that depression and addiction don’t have to be for ever

As a psychiatrist whose job is to preserve healthy minds, it feels a little unusual to be championing a mental health advocate who punches people in the head for a job. But that’s where I find myself with Tyson Fury.

On Sunday, having set my alarm for silly o’clock in the morning, I got up, boiled the kettle and sat down to watch two grown men try to knock each other into states of unconsciousness; the kind I’d always been taught to avoid at medical school. I’m not really a fan of boxing. Besides the risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy induced by a head injury (“punch-drunk syndrome”), I’ve never understood how bloody violence is permissible in society so long as it’s within a ring?   more

DARK DAYS Tyson Fury reveals harrowing story of suicide attempt during depression, voice that saved his life

The former unified heavyweight world champion fell to an astonishing low after achieving his ultimate high

Tyson Fury has told the shocking story of his depression-induced suicide attempt for the first time. Having previously admitted to mental health issues and drug addiction during his time away from boxing in 2016 and 2017, Fury is known to have endured a tortuous spell in his life after winning the world heavyweight titles.

However, he has now revealed the lowest point of this period – when he attempted to take his own life.
“I tried to commit suicide,” Fury told the Joe Rogan Podcast, “I’ll tell you what happened.

“I was waking up and I didn’t want to be alive, I was making everybody’s life a misery, everybody who was close to me I was pushing away.
“Nobody could talk any sense into me at all and I’d go very, very, very low at times, very low. And I’d start thinking all these crazy thoughts.
“I bought a brand new Ferrari convertible in the summer of 2016, and I was in it and I was on this strip of the highway where I am.  more

Super Agent Prince Comes Back From Opiate Addiction; Micky Ward and Prince In Q n A

The issue is one that transcends all boundaries and spheres. Opiate addiction hits in every pocket of society, and but of course, touches people in all walks of life and stations.

Sports agent Darren Prince has enjoyed a top grade roster of clients, and today, just having moved to LA after growing up and residing in NJ, reps names like Ric Flair, Hulk Hogan, Dennis Rodman, Charlie Sheen and ex fighters Roy Jones Jr and Micky Ward.

Tonight, Oct. 18, Prince, age 48, will appear at a book-store in NJ to sign copies of his memoir, “Aiming High: How a Prominent Sports and Celebrity Agent Hit Bottom at the Top,” alongside Ward.   more