What Happens To Your Brain When You Have A Hangover

To some people, part of going out with friends is drinking alcohol. Even though it may be fun at the time, especially since that new speakeasy serves amazing, one-of-a-kind drinks, the aftermath may not be as fun. Yep, the hangover: You’re exhausted, feel as though your head will explode since it hurts so much, and you may be nauseous or vomiting, too, among other symptoms. But something you may not think about is what happens to your brain when you’re hungover.

“The effects of alcohol are more significant than some realize — it impacts brain function and neurochemistry,” Dr. Adam Lipson, a neurosurgeon at IGEA Brain & Spine, tells Bustle. “Frequent hangovers are a sign of alcoholism. In my world as a surgeon, one hangover is too much. Everyone has a different relationship with this issue, but frequent hangovers should be considered a red flag.”

While you may not think a post-drinking headache is a big deal, a lot more is going on inside your head after drinking alcohol than you may think. Below, you’ll find some key things that happen to your brain when you have a hangover, according to experts and studies.  more

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Sober October: What happens when you stop drinking? How quitting alcohol can make you healthier and happier

The campaign encourages people to go for 31 days without drinking a drop of alcohol.

Aside from being a great way to give back, there are plenty of other reasons why people are choosing to ditch the booze this month, from slimming their waistlines to saving some pennies.

We know that cutting alcohol from our lifestyles can help improve our liver and heart health, but what are some of the other benefits of going teetotal and how long before you see the effect on your overall health?

Here, Dr Fiona Sim, a former GP and medical advisor to Drinkaware, answers all of your questions about what happens to your body when you stop drinking:   more

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A Story of Drug Addiction, Alcoholism and Dual-Diagnosis

Dual-Diagnosis in Recovery from Addiction

Dual-diagnosis is defined as having a substance use disorder like drug addiction or Alcoholism that is accompanied by one or more mental health disorders. In the United States, I am one out of 7.9 million people that live with a dual-diagnosis, also known as co-occurring disorders (SAMHSA, 2014).

You may be wondering what has enticed me to disclose my personal experience and I feel obliged to do so. To start, you should know that diagnosing a person with dual disorders is often elusive due to the intricacy and the severity of different symptoms one may be exposed to.  more

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Why You Have Drug Dreams Once You’re Sober

If you’re recovering from an addiction and have been sober for awhile, you may start to experience disturbing dreams. It’s a common occurrence to experience dreams so vivid, you wake up believing you just used drugs. This is usually terrifying if you’ve been struggling with recovery from addiction and you may even experience a sense of guilt when you wake up. Drug dreams will usually be a nightmare with the conscious fear of relapse.

These dreams are a part of the recovery process and can even be considered positive. They can be a gauge on how your recovery is moving along. You might think you’ve made it past your addiction but sometimes, there’s an underlying part of you that is still dependent on the substance.  more

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The Double Demons of Depression and Addiction

One of the most moving talks I ever heard was given by former U.S. Senator George McGovern. He spoke eloquently about his daughter Terry, who had both alcoholism and depression. He gave a detailed account of all that he, his wife and many others did to help Terry recover, only to be shocked and saddened late one December evening when a police officer and minister came to his home to tell the McGoverns that Terry was dead. She had gotten drunk, passed out in the cold and froze to death.

In a book he wrote to tell this story, simply titled Terry (1997), Senator McGovern provides a heart wrenching description of the life and tragic death of his beloved daughter.  more

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Are Alcoholism and OCD Related?

Are alcoholism and OCD related? It’s a common question, and the short answer is yes, in many ways not just alcoholism but addiction in general has been shown to have some relationship with obsessive-compulsive disorder or OCD. We’ll talk about what OCD is, and some of the ways there are relationships between this mental disorder and addiction, including alcoholism.

You’ve probably heard people joke around and say they’re OCD when it comes to everything from avoiding germs to keeping their house a certain way, but OCD is actually a diagnosable mental health disorder that goes beyond liking things clean or orderly. With alcoholism, there are often underlying co-occurring mental health disorders a person suffers from, and OCD and alcoholism are just one example of this.  more

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Cary Grant: how 100 acid trips in Tinseltown ‘changed my life’

In the late 1950s, at the height of his fame, Cary Grant set off on a trip in search of his true self, unpicking the myth he had spent three decades perfecting. He tried hypnosis and yoga and felt that they both came up short. So he began dropping acid and claimed to have found inner peace. “During my LSD sessions, I would learn a great deal,” he would later remark. “And the result was a rebirth. I finally got where I wanted to go.”

Grant’s adventures in psychedelia – an estimated 100 sessions, spanning the years 1958-1961 – provide the basis for Becoming Cary Grant, a fascinating documentary that plays at next week’s Cannes film festival. It’s a film that takes its lead from Grant himself, undressing and probing the star of North by Northwest to the point where the very title risks feeling like a red herring. “Like all documentary makers, we started out looking at the construction of Cary Grant,” says producer Nick Ware. “But we ended up deconstructing him through the LSD sessions.” 

“In one LSD dream I imagined myself as a giant penis launching off from Earth like a spaceship”

    —  Cary Grant
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