Insane 100 – My Story – Hearing Voices(E1- P3)

Part 3 of 3

FROM: INSANE100 BLOG OWNER

To anyone following this blog, I appreciate your support! I started this blog in June of 2018 to share my story of addiction and hearing voices. I am not a great writer, so me and my sister thought putting my story on video might be a better option. In the mean time I have been posting articles dealing with mental health. I hope these articles have brought some attention to mental illness and/or addiction. While I will continue to post articles dealing w/ mental health/illness, I would also like to share my story, any feedback will be appreciated.

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Insane 100 – My Story – Hearing Voices

FROM: INSANE100 BLOG OWNER

To anyone following this blog, I appreciate your support! I started this blog in June of 2018 to share my story of addiction and hearing voices. I am not a great writer, so me and my sister thought putting my story on video might be a better option. In the mean time I have been posting articles dealing with mental health. I hope these articles have brought some attention to mental illness and/or addiction. While I will continue to post articles dealing w/ mental health/illness, I would also like to share my story, any feedback will be appreciated.

 

 

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The real reason the sound of your own voice makes you cringe

Does the sound of your own voice make you want to cover your ears? You are not aloneAn open mouth.

 Hate the sound of your own voice? We all do. But why? Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

Most of us have shuddered on hearing the sound of our own voice. In fact, not liking the sound of your own voice is so common that there’s a term for it: voice confrontation.

But why is voice confrontation so frequent, while barely a thought is given to the voices of others?

A common explanation often found in popular media is that because we normally hear our own voice while talking, we receive both sound transferred to our ears externally by air conduction and sound transferred internally through our bones. This bone conduction of sound delivers rich low frequencies that are not included in air-conducted vocal sound. So when you hear your recorded voice without these frequencies, it sounds higher – and different. Basically, the reasoning is that because our recorded voice does not sound how we expect it to, we don’t like it.  more

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Voices: Overheard in Psychosis But Underheard in Autism

One of the many opposite symptoms of autism as opposed to psychosisthat was apparent from the beginning was that a classic symptom of schizophrenia is hearing voices, whereas a common complaint about autistics is that they seem to be deaf, and many autistics report difficulty hearing what someone is saying in a noisy ambience.

Now two different studies, kindly brought to my attention by Bernard Crespi, not only confirm this feature of the diametric model of mental illness, but also go some considerable way towards explaining it.

Not only psychotics, but a minority of the general population also experience auditory hallucinations frequently and without distress. As a recent study by Ben Alderson-Day and colleagues points out, “non-clinical voice-hearing (NCVH) is featurally similar to auditory verbal hallucinations described in psychosis, but usually more controllable and positive in content.”  more

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100 Voices: Laura Sheeran On The Need to Talk About Suicide: #NowWereTalking

We invited a 100-strong chorus of artists, writers, musicians, broadcasters, sports stars and more to contribute to Now We’re Talking, a mental health campaign, run in partnership with Lyons Tea and Pieta House. Laura Sheeran shares her story…

I can’t say that I’ve battled with depression or suffered any serious mental health issues – and I’m very lucky to be able to say that – but many of my friends and family have. I’ve known so many people who’ve died by suicide. The first time I lost somebody that I cared about to suicide I was 11. My mom’s best friend died by suicide and she took her two children with her. It was the most horrific, tragic thing ever. So as a kid I became aware of these things.   more

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Kylie Minogue opens up about anxiety battle: ‘there are voices in my head’

Kylie Minogue has opened up about her mental health a year after she split from her husband-to-be.
The Australian pop star, 49, is adored by millions around the world as the princess of pop, but her personal life has not been so lucky.
Privately she has been harbouring mental health challenges, admitting in a new interview: “I probably would benefit from [counseling].”

On the cusp of releasing her 14th studio album, Golden, she told gay magazine Attitude: “There are a lot of voices in my head.
“I guess part of that is our brains, they’re problem solvers, tick tick tick tick tick…
“[When I’m feeling anxious] I put the kettle on and make a cup of tea… But if I knew the answer I would do it and I would have no anxiety.
“They say that the fast track to happiness is gratitude and it’s true, just think that thought.”  more

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Live and loud, concerts are my ticket to fighting depression

Adam Duritz, frontman of the roots-rock group Counting Crows, is standing 50 feet in front of me singing “Miami” in a packed farm field near Nashville on a Saturday afternoon.

The song includes one of my favorite lyrics from the band – “She could pull the sunlight through me.” Duritz delivers the line with energy that rises along the course of the sentence, and it makes me feel hopeful every time I hear it. Right now, it’s a little ironic, because in 10 minutes the show is going to end abruptly due to the threat of lightning.

But in this moment, I’m inundated by a riot of guitars and percussion and fans singing along. Each time Jim Bogios pounds the bass drum, it feels like a punch going straight through me. The louder everything gets around me, the quieter it gets in my mind, which is typically a pretty noisy place. I’m not just here for the entertainment. I’m here as part of a self-prescribed program to fight depression.  more

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What’s it like to go through a psychotic break

The Mental Health Awareness Week just finished, and here we share the story of Clara Cervantes, a 22-year old psychology student, who first experienced auditory hallucinations at age 11. She currently still battles with anxiety.

I experienced my first psychotic break — the first time I hallucinated — when I was eleven years old. It was said to be a result of genetics, deep depression and anxiety. Somewhere along the way, the paranoia and the auditory hallucinations crept in, deluding me into believing the most ridiculous of things. It led me to mistrust my family.

I kept hearing about my own murder plot; I honestly believed everyone was out to get me.

Having major depression and anxiety felt as if the world was in a perpetual state of gray. There was no longer any meaning in life. I was hollowed out. Empty. Getting out of the house was more of an achievement than anything. And on the rare moments I did, all I wanted to do was hide away.  more

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