Mental Health Expert Talks Hollywood’s Battle with Depression

Mental illness has long had a stigma associated it, and Hollywood is working to shine a light on the problem, both for those in and out of the entertainment industry.

Kita S. Curry has made a career of studying mental health as president and CEO of Didi Hirsch Mental Health Services, the nation’s leading provider of community health and substance use programs. Curry spoke to Variety about the struggle many actors and musicians have with depression and substance abuse, due both to their hectic schedules and dealings with fame.  more

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Mental illness or brain injury? Driven by voices to commit crime, Titus Young is in prison but still believes he could play in the NFL

Titus Young was once classified among the most dangerous inmates at the Twin Towers Correctional Facility in downtown Los Angeles and spent most of his days in lockdown. In early 2017, he started to write.

“I have made so many mistakes I have become a little ashamed of being Titus Young,” he scribbled in fast-paced printing. “A lot of the stuff I have done was out of my control during the time. … I was hearing voices.

“Hearing voices is no joke, it’s actually very scary. I feel like someone is trying to come kill me.”
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How hearing voices, long assumed a sign of mental illness, can be a part of the human experience

Kevin Healey hears voices and music no one else can. When he’s in a good mood, his auditory hallucinations sound as though he’s in the midst of a party, with jovial voices cracking jokes and making him laugh. When he’s having a hard time, the voices tease him and escalate into angry shouts if he ignores them. He rarely experiences silence.
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The Enemy Within: PEOPLE WHO HEAR VOICES IN THEIR HEADS ARE BEING ENCOURAGED TO TALK BACK

‘My brothers in Paradise tell me what I must do,’ said Joan of Arc, who claimed that her orders came from saints and angels

One night, during her first year at the University of Sheffield, Rachel Waddingham struggled to fall asleep. She could hear three middle-aged men she didn’t know talking about her downstairs. “They were saying, ‘She’s stupid, she’s ugly, I wish she would kill herself’,” she remembers. “I was angry and went down to challenge them, but no one was there. They kept laughing and saying, ‘She’ll never find us.’”
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