Did You Play Outside A Lot As A Kid? Turns Out, It Might’ve Improved Your Mental Health

A little bit of green can go a long way. Past research has shown that greenery and nature can do wonders for your mood or even boost your immunity, but a new study published in PNAS just took these mental benefits to the next level.

By examining satellite images of the green spaces surrounding the childhood homes of almost a million people, researchers found that children who grew up around lots of green space had a 55 percent reduction in risk of developing mental disorders in adulthood. The study also took into account other factors like socio-economic status and genetics—and greenery still reigned supreme.

To dive even further into their findings, researchers say that timing does actually matter for getting your green space in. These mind-boosting benefits are most potent up to the age of 10, making our childhood years the best time to root ourselves in nature.  more

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Kids From Trauma NEED Someone to Tell Them Their Normal Isn’t “Normal”

It took me a quarter of a century (literally) to realize that I experienced trauma throughout certain points in my childhood. It took me another year to realize that my behaviors were deeply rooted in how I responded to that trauma. And it took me even longer to realize that my emotions during those years were not normal.

It seems obvious, doesn’t it?

The thing was… no one told me that the things I was doing weren’t normal. And a lot of times, as a kid, if someone doesn’t outright tell you something, then you have no idea.

I didn’t know that it wasn’t normal to self-harm at twelve years old. All of the friends I’d chosen were doing it so I assumed ALL preteens were doing it. None of us hurt ourselves to fit in with each other (we actually knew each other for quite a while before admitting to one another that we were self-harming), but we were all doing it to cope with something. We were all kids with messy stories, which drew us together like magnets.  more

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The No. 1 Trap That Keeps People In Relationships With Psychopaths

We often talk about gratitude like it’s the miracle cure. Don’t get me wrong: While I have a lot in my life to be grateful for, gratitude—like mindfulness, eating clean, and other well-intentioned solutions—can have their dark sides.

The then-partner of one of my clients once told her she should be grateful he hadn’t laid a finger on her since the year began. Another’s told him he had nothing to be depressed or traumatized about and should be grateful she was still there with him, despite her escalating abuse. My ex-partner held me emotionally hostage for every tiny piecemeal change he made before regressing to worse behavior.

You see, gratitude can sometimes become your blinders, your ball and chain in an abusive relationship.  more

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KATE MIDDLETON DEVOTES HER DAY TO MENTAL HEALTH – WEEKS AFTER BROTHER’S DEPRESSION REVELATION

Kate Middleton devoted her recent day out to a cause that is personal to her. The Duchess of Cambridge spent Wednesday, February 13, at engagements geared towards mental health and wellness. The 37-year-old’s day of mental health consisted of two engagements that pushed an open dialogue, advocated and championed mental health for youth. Kate’s first stop was a visit to the Mental Health in Education conference. The royal met with various educators who spoke about the importance of mental health training in schools.

The Duchess, who wore a tweed suit by Dolce & Gabbana for the occasion, spoke about the importance of mental health awareness in children. “It is clear that positive development of our children is directly linked to those who care for them, teachers, carers and parents,” she said during her speech. She continued: “The evidence is clear the first few years of a child’s life are more pivotal for development and for future health and happiness than any other single moment in our lifetime.”  more

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Cybersecurity Mental Health Warning — 1 In 6 CISOs Now Medicate Or Use Alcohol

A new global study of cybersecurity professionals has revealed the true extent to which the stresses and pressures facing the average CISO impact upon both professional and personal life. It should come as no surprise that stress is part of the job description for the CISO, and every one of the 408 questioned for the Life Inside the Perimeter: Understanding the Modern CISO report, commissioned by Nominet, said they were indeed experiencing stress. However, that 17% said that they had turned to medication or alcohol to help deal with that stress should be a statistic that shocks us all.

Stress is undoubtedly playing a part as far as the decline in the mental health of the modern CISO is concerned; 91% of the CISOs surveyed said the levels of stress they were suffering was moderate or high and 60% rarely disconnected from their work role. That 88% worked more than 40 hours per week isn’t a shocker, nor the 27% that work up to 60 hours, but with 1 in 5 being available 24/7 and 89% of U.S. based CISOs never having had a two week break from their job, the true extent of this disconnect problem becomes clear.  more

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The cost of staying silent on mental health

When his self-employment worries escalated, a writer found it hard to ask for help

Earlier this year, I admitted myself to psychiatric hospital. I went in voluntarily, only to watch nurses search through my possessions to remove anything I could harm myself with: razor, pills, iPhone cable. I was put on watch, and for days I was not allowed outside unaccompanied.

I shared a ward with people in financial services, law, advertising, the drinks industry, commercial aviation, the military, and more. Men and women diagnosed with depression, anxiety, bulimia, anorexia, self-harming, personality disorders, and chronic addiction to drink, drugs and gambling.  more

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Newly discharged mental health patients at much higher risk of death

Such patients are 90 times more likely to die from drugs overdose than general population, research finds

People with mental health problems are at a hugely increased risk of dying from unnatural causes, including suicide, soon after they have been discharged from hospital, new research reveals.

Such patients are 38 times more likely to die of fatal poisoning and 90 times more likely to perish from a drugs overdose than the general population, according to a new study.

Experts say the difficulties some people with serious mental illness have in adjusting to life after a spell of inpatient care are likely to explain the higher death rate among that group of vulnerable patients.  more

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