Newly discharged mental health patients at much higher risk of death

Such patients are 90 times more likely to die from drugs overdose than general population, research finds

People with mental health problems are at a hugely increased risk of dying from unnatural causes, including suicide, soon after they have been discharged from hospital, new research reveals.

Such patients are 38 times more likely to die of fatal poisoning and 90 times more likely to perish from a drugs overdose than the general population, according to a new study.

Experts say the difficulties some people with serious mental illness have in adjusting to life after a spell of inpatient care are likely to explain the higher death rate among that group of vulnerable patients.  more

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A Psych Ward Doctor On Treating Patients On The Brink Of Suicide

“They’re playing with one of the big existential issues for all of us, which is death,” says Dr. Stuart Beck of Mass General.

On a recent Monday, clinical staff at Massachusetts General Hospital had gathered with a patient as she prepared for discharge from the psychiatric ward. After nearly everyone had said their goodbyes, the patient turned to Dr. Stuart Beck, the soft-spoken psychiatrist who runs the ward.

“Hey you, Dr. Beck,” the patient blurted out. “You got anything to tell me?”

The Boston hospital has 1,011 beds, only 24 of which are reserved for the psychiatric ward. Vacancies on the ward are rapidly filled, and Beck and his staff are always busy, moving from one bed to the next as they make decisions about medications, treatment plans and whether it’s safe enough to let a particular patient go. Still, Beck tries to build a connection with his patients and uncover the deeper issues that brought them to his ward.  more

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After a Spouse’s Death, Sleep Woes Up Health Risks

The death of a spouse can understandably bring sleepless nights. Now, research suggests those sleep troubles raise the odds of immune system dysfunction — which in turn can trigger chronic inflammation.

For the surviving spouse, that could mean an increased risk for heart disease and cancer, though the study did not prove a cause-and-effect link.

“We think these individuals are more vulnerable to the negative effects of poor sleep,” said corresponding author Diana Chirinos. She’s a research assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

The study included 101 people, average age 67. Half had recently lost a spouse, while the other half were married or single.

Researchers found that the association between sleep disturbances and inflammation was two to three times higher in the grieving spouses, according to the study published recently in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine.  more

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FBI Seeks to Understand the Psychology of Mass Shooters

In a sign of how common mass killings have become, a proposed study would mirror past research on serial killers, assassins

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is embarking on an effort to better understand the psychology behind mass shooters, a sign of how pervasive the tragedies have become.

The FBI has conducted a limited number of interviews with perpetrators of mass killings in an effort to find commonalities in what motivated them to attack. Now the Bureau is considering expanding that into a broad-based study in which it would interview numerous mass shooters and look for patterns in their backgrounds, thinking and behavior.

“We’re definitely missing a piece of the puzzle through the offenders’ eyes,” said Sarah Craun, research coordinator with the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit.  more

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Suicide: A Tragic Sign of the Times

The suicide epidemic is a social fact.

Unknown by many people is the fact that the rate of suicide is sharply on the rise in the U.S. and has been for more than a decade. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline recently reported that its annual call volume has doubled from 1 million in 2014 to more than 2 million in 2017.

Incredibly, there are now 45,000 suicides in the U.S. annually, which means that suicides outnumber murders nearly three-to-one.

The federal statistics also reveal that suicide demographic patterns are changing in the U.S. Suicide is no longer concentrated among isolated, elderly Americans and, to a lesser extent, troubled teenagers. It has been dramatically on the rise among middle-aged Americans. There has also been a dramatic increase in suicides among veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.  more

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The Real Life Horror Tale of the Twisted “Co-ed Killer”

Ed Kemper is a genius, psychopath and necrophile.

Ed Kemper

Read the following true tale of horror at your own risk.

Edmund Kemper III, a psychopathic serial killer and necrophile who became known as “The Co-ed Killer,” was born December 18, 1948, in Burbank, California. He was arrested in April of 1973, at the age of twenty-four, after murdering six female students, his own mother, and her mother’s best friend.

Despite his relative youth upon capture, Kemper had actually committed his first two murders nearly a decade earlier. Kemper was an extremely intelligent child but he engaged in psychopathic behavior early on. For Kemper, this behavior included the torture and killing of animals, which is a common childhood practice among nearly half of all serial killers.

During childhood, Kemper was physically and emotionally abused by his alcoholic mother, Clarnell, who was divorced from his father. Clarnell frequently locked her son in a dark basement alone at night.

Not surprisingly, Edmund grew up to hate his mother and at the age of 14 ran away from home in search of his father in Van Nuys, California. After locating but being rejected by his father, young Edmund was sent to live with his paternal grandmother and grandfather in North Fork, California. Kemper claims that his grandmother, similar to his mother, was very abusive and he disliked her intensely.

In 1964, at the age of 15, Edmund shot his grandmother in the head allegedly just to see what it felt like. He then killed his grandfather, too, because he believed that his grandfather would be angry at him for killing his grandmother. Kemper was subsequently committed to the Atascadero State Hospital for the criminally insane. To his chagrin, he was released into his mother’s care in 1969 after less than five years of confinement and treatment. His juvenile criminal record was expunged.

As a young adult, Kemper stood six-foot-nine and weighed 280 pounds. He frequently thought about killing his mother by 1970 but was not yet ready to do so. The prospect of killing his mother without first perfecting his murder skills on others was too overwhelming for Kemper.  more

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Jack the Ripper Identified

Unmasking Jack the Ripper 127 years after his murders suddenly stopped.

The tale of Jack the Ripper involves five extremely brutal slayings of prostitutes between August and November of 1888 in the Whitechapel area of London, England. Legend has it that the perpetrator called himself Jack the Ripper in letters he sent to the London police—taking credit for the crimes. It was commonly believed that the Ripper was a medical doctor due to the significant cutting of the victims’ bodies.

The Ripper case was the first serial killer story in history to cause a widespread media frenzy and that was due to the proliferation of inexpensive broadsheet newspapers in Victorian London in the late 19th century. By the fall of 1888, at the height of the Ripper’s killing spree, one million newspapers with updated stories on the case were sold each day—an unprecedented circulation of newspapers at the time.

The Jack the Ripper case has generated a glut of conspiracy theories concerning his identity over the years. In fact, there are at least 100 different theories about the identity of Jack the Ripper. One of the most colorful involves a British royal family connection and the Freemasons. Indeed, much of the legend of Jack the Ripper is pure mythology, including the iconic image of the top hat wearing gentleman that accompanies this article.  more

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DARK DAYS Tyson Fury reveals harrowing story of suicide attempt during depression, voice that saved his life

The former unified heavyweight world champion fell to an astonishing low after achieving his ultimate high

Tyson Fury has told the shocking story of his depression-induced suicide attempt for the first time. Having previously admitted to mental health issues and drug addiction during his time away from boxing in 2016 and 2017, Fury is known to have endured a tortuous spell in his life after winning the world heavyweight titles.

However, he has now revealed the lowest point of this period – when he attempted to take his own life.
“I tried to commit suicide,” Fury told the Joe Rogan Podcast, “I’ll tell you what happened.

“I was waking up and I didn’t want to be alive, I was making everybody’s life a misery, everybody who was close to me I was pushing away.
“Nobody could talk any sense into me at all and I’d go very, very, very low at times, very low. And I’d start thinking all these crazy thoughts.
“I bought a brand new Ferrari convertible in the summer of 2016, and I was in it and I was on this strip of the highway where I am.  more

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SUICIDE IS PREVENTABLE, AND ‘EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS’

“Suicide is very, very complex,” said Itasca County Public Health Division Manager Kelly Chandler during a presentation to the Itasca County Board of Commissioners. On Tuesday, Oct. 23, Chandler provided the board with an exploration of suicide in Itasca County.

Tuesday’s presentation helped identify patterns in suicides, “with the goal of providing some upstream preventative work and early identification and treatment approaches to persons contemplating suicide or struggling with mental health in general,” said Chandler.

“There usually is not one single event that causes a suicide, and no single path leads someone to that place,” she explained. However, there can be some patterns or series of events that contribute to someone contemplating and completing a suicide.

“We often hear this narrative surrounding bullying, for example,” said Chandler. “Can bullying be a contributing factor? Yes, absolutely. Especially if the victim feels like they can’t escape what’s happening to them or they don’t feel like they’re receiving the help they need.”  more

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YUNGBLUD TACKLES DEPRESSION, ANXIETY ON “KILL SOMEBODY” MUSIC VIDEO

YUNGBLUD is debuting a heart-wrenching new music video for “Kill Somebody.”

The video is a visual representation of what anxiety and depression feel like inside his head, according to the songwriter. Watch it below!

YUNGBLUD’s  “Kill Somebody” is uncomfortable. First, it shows the musician covered in blood in his hands and face. The idea of suicide is also present throughout the video.

The violence is not gratuitous, though. The video is supposed to be a visual depiction of the anxiety and depression he suffers.

“This song is about the darkest place I discovered in my mind. At first it really scared me. But i learned to talk about it,” he explains on Instagram. “For those of you who have felt or feel any type of darkness, know your not alone. Mental health is finally being taken seriously allowing conversations to be had and this song helped me free myself from the weight of it for a while.”

The singer/songwriter also adds that he kept the track stripped back in order not to “cloud the message behind it.”

The music video is a visual depiction of what depression and anxiety feel like inside YUNGBLUD’s head.  more

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